Dogs & Fall Allergies: What To Look For and What To Do To Help Alleviate The Discomfort.

Just as with humans, the change of seasons means the change of allergies. Although, Fall doesn’t have new blooming and growth that can cause irritations on your dog, it does have dying plants in higher winds, moisture and cooler temperatures. This can increase pollen, dust, dead leaves or grass, which can spread through the air and may cause your dog irritations when inhaled.

There are no specific Fall allergies by definition, but here are some symptoms to look for when you dog experiences inhalant allergies:

  • Scratching
  • Paw Licking
  • Itchy Red Eyes
  • Sneezing
  • Coughing

As you can expect the symptoms to go away with the completion of the season change, it is always best to consult with your veterinarian as chronic cases can cause lasting damage to your pet. Typically, antihistamines are recommended but again, we highly recommend you consult with your veterinary before administering any kind of over the counter medicines.

Medicated shampoo and conditioners can alleviate dry, itchy skin. If you notice your dog has dry skin with dandruff, a tar and sulfur shampoo can help (available with your grooming service at Dog Thrive). Think of it as the Head & Shoulders for dogs! Also, according to an article by PetMD.com, Omega 3 Fatty Acids is a very popular type of supplement that can help dogs with conditions like dry skin or allergies.

Lastly, allergies will change as your dog ages. If the seasonal change never affected your pooch before, that doesn’t mean they will always be in the clear. Also, no breeds are safe, but flat faced breeds like Bulldogs, Boston Terriers or Boxers tend to be affected at a higher rate.

There is a reason dogs are the best companions on earth and partly is because of how similar we are to them. So, when you notice everyone sneezing and coughing in the grocery store or any other public place, keep a close eye on your dog as they may be experiencing some discomfort due to allergies, but the good news is that it can be diagnosed and alleviated! The more we know about our furry best friends the better.